Firing Because Of Bankruptcy Is Illegal

Employee Terminated Because Of Bankruptcy Gets Right To Trial In Federal Court

I must admit that I don’t ever remember seeing a case involving bankruptcy discrimination --- so when I ran across a recent federal court case out of Florida on the subject, it struck me as one well worth talking about.

The case,  Myers v. TooJay's Management Corporation, is important because there are so few cases on the topic and because bankruptcy affects so many people. The case also highlights some flaws in the statute which could really use a Congressional fix.

 What Happened In The Case

Plaintiff Eric Myers filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in January of 2008. Around the same time, Myers moved his family to Florida to live with his parents. His debts were fully discharged in May of 2008.

At some point, Myers heard about an opening at one of Defendant TooJay’s restaurants in Sumter County, Florida for a management position.  He called the company contact, Tom Thornton, about the position. Thornton interviewed Myers and the interview went well.

Myers was then scheduled for a two day on the job evaluation which was held at on July 31st and August 1st. During those two days, for which he was paid,  Myers shadowed various employees.became familiar with restaurant procedures.

At the end of the second day, Thornton told Myers that he had performed well and according to Myers, offered him a job.  He was told that he was supposed to start work on August 18, 2008 at a salary of between $50,000 and $55,000 for a 40 hour week.

Thornton contended that he never told Myers he was officially hired, never discussed hours, salary, or a start date.

Thornton contended  he told Myers that any offer of employment was contingent on a background check.

There was no dispute that Thornton photocopied Myers' drivers license and social security card and had Myers complete and sign several employment forms including :

  • an IRS withholding W-4 form
  • an order form for TooJay’s uniform and shoes
  • a food employee reporting agreement
  • an assistant manger trade secret non-disclosure agreement
  • an I-9 employment eligibility verification form.

Thornton also gave Myers a copy of TooJay’s employee handbook and sexual harassment policy, and directed Myers to sign forms indicating that he received copies. On each form, Myers signed in the blank listed for “employee signature.

Myers was also asked to sign a document which permitted TooJay to conduct a background check and consumer credit report check.

After that, Myers notified his then employer that he was resigning so that he could start at TooJay’s.

A little more than a week later, Myers received a letter from TooJay’s stating that it was rescinding its previous offer of employment because of the credit report. He called the Vice President of Human Resources and was told that he was not hired because he had filed for bankruptcy and that TooJay’s, as a matter of corporate policy, did not hire individuals who had a bankruptcy on their credit report.

Myers went back to his prior employer and asked for his job back but it was too late. His work hours had already been distributed to other employees, and he was told that he could only be rehired at a reduced schedule.

According to Myers no one told him that his employment at TooJay’s was contingent on a satisfactory credit report.

Myers filed a complaint in the United States District Court in Florida claiming bankruptcy discrimination in violation of 11 U.S.C s. 525(b).

Continue Reading...